The Fairy Pools – a short story for children

I wrote this story after an inspiring visit to Skye – and the beautiful ‘Fairy Pools’ at the foot of the Cuillins. The story was published in Scholastic’s ‘WOW 366′ for children (primary school age), where each story was told in just 366 words. Copyright has since reverted back to authors.

The Fairy Pools 

by

Liz MacWhirter

 

“Oooh another one!” cried the fairy called Clover as yet another human child’s face appeared, looming large through the mountain pool.

The fairies dived into the otter hole. Clover peeked out: the girl’s blue eyes glittered as she stared into the water. Clover liked her freckles and smile.

She heard the girl call to her parents:

“I can see fairy jewels!”

The words bubbled through the water.

“No such thing as fairies or fairy jewels – they’ll just be stones,” they replied.

The girl looked sad.

And Clover felt sad.

“Wouldn’t it be nice,” Clover said to the older fairy, Rose,  “if they believed!”

“Nonsense! Then we wouldn’t be safe at all!” Rose replied, wagging her finger at Clover and telling her again how many more people were coming here since ‘The Fairy Pools’ had been listed in the humans’ local Tourist Guide, as a pixie had told them.

“Yes but why don’t we just find somewhere else to live?”

Rose told her a thousand and one reasons why they’d be better staying put – hiding.

Clover kicked a pebble.

She watched as the girl turned around and jumped up. And then Clover saw that the girl had fairy wings!

Quick as a blink, Clover darted upstream. She flew up the waterfall, through deep green-blue pools and up high. Yes! No mistake: fairy wings fluttered in the breeze!

Clover secretly flew after the girl with her toy wings and her parents as they hiked up the mountain, higher and higher till the air felt fresh, and she trembled with excitement.

And that was when Clover saw the crack in the rock. Bluebells peeked out, beckoning her in. It was heaven! A mountain stream bubbled down, surrounded by bluebells and snowdrops and wild garlic flowers, covered in delicious dew. It was the perfect new home! Safe and quiet and far from harm.

Clover darted back to tell the others.

But first, she flew right up to the little girl who stood, open-mouthed, as Clover smiled at her, kissed her on the cheek then flew away.

“I’ve seen a fairy!” the little girl cried.

And Clover smiled when she heard the reply: “No such thing as fairies.”

 

 

By Liz Holt